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GNOME Asia 2014

I spent last weekend in Beijing attending GNOME Asia 2014; yeah, long trip from Europe just for 3 days, but it was totally worth it. The worst part of it was of course fighting jet lag when I arrived, and fighting it again 3 days later when I came back to Spain :) The conference was really well organized [1], so kudos to all the local team!

After a quick sleep on Friday morning, I attended the development and documentation training sessions that Kat, André and Dave gave. They were quite interesting, especially since I’m not involved in the real user documentation that GNOME provides. I have to say that these guys do an amazing job, not only teaching during conferences, but also through the whole year.

There are, from my point of view, two main ways of learning new things:

  • The ‘engineer’ way: Learning things as you need them, what you would do when you start writing an application and looking for examples of how to do what you want to do (autotools, anyone?). It is a very ‘engineer’ way, as you pick black boxes that you’ll use to build something bigger, while not fully understanding what the black box does inside.
  • The ‘scientific’ way: When you learn something in order to fully understand it and be able to teach others. This approach takes a lot longer, as you need to make sure that everything you learn is accurate and you end up questioning the things that are not clear enough. Learning stuff to teach others is actually what you do in University; you’re learning things that will afterwards need to be explained in an exam to someone who knows more about the subject than you do.

Sure, both ways have their ups and downs, but if you want to write software you need to be able to switch between those two mindsets constantly. You’ll use the engineer way when reading API docs, looking for the bits and pieces that you need to build your stuff. You’ll use the ‘scientific’ way when you need to start learning a new technology, or when you need more detail on how to do things. While the API docs are taken care of by the library developers, it is the documentation team the one making sure that user guides, tutorials, and other developer resources are kept up to date, which are definitely some of the toughest and most important tasks done to help newcomers and other developers. So go on, go learn GNOME technologies and teach others, join the documentation team! ;)

GNOME Asia is not a usual conference. If you have attended a Desktop Summit, GUADEC or FOSDEM before, all those conferences are built by developers and for developers. The focus of those conferences is usually not (explicitly) to attract newcomers, but instead to be a show of the latest and shiniest things happening in the projects. Of course we also had part of that in Beijing, say Lennart’s talk about the status of systemd or Allan’s talk about application bundles. Those both were very good talks, but likely too specific for most of the audience. Instead, I chose to talk about something more basic, focused on attracting newcomers wanting to write applications, and so I gave an Introduction to D-Bus talk, including some examples. It is the same talk I gave last year in GUADEC-ES, but in English this time (my Mandarin is not good enough).

I would like to thank the GNOME Foundation for sponsoring the flight to Beijing, and of course to all the local team who, as I already said, did an amazing job.

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[1] …except for the tea-less tea-breaks ;)

GNOME.Asia 2012

Finally back home after attending GNOME.Asia 2012 and some vacation time afterwards.

 

CC BY-NC-SA 2.0, Sammy Fung

The conference started on Friday afternoon, with a design workshop managed by Allan Day, Jakub Steiner and William Jon McCann. It was pretty interesting, truth be told, and I particularly enjoyed how Jakub played with Inkscape to create the icon of “GNOME Ball” (now we just need a program for the icon). I truly want to spend more time with Inkscape now, and try to draw something better than my previous attempts to draw an icon/logo.

 

CC BY-NC-SA 2.0, Sammy Fung

I gave two talks during the first day of the conference, one about Tracker (slides here) and another one about ModemManager (slides here). The talks were recorded, but official videos of the talks are not yet available on the Internet.

 

Thanks to the usual jet lag, I also found time to develop the application-menu support for Devhelp during my stay in Hong Kong. The code is currently available in the ‘application-menu’ branch in the gnome git repo, and tracked at GB#677927.

 

Finally, thanks to my employer, Lanedo GmbH, for sponsoring my attendance to this great conference!

Speaking at GNOME.Asia 2012 (Hong Kong)

Only 3 weeks left for GNOME.Asia, this year in the beautiful city of Hong Kong.

According to the current schedule I’ll be giving two talks on Saturday June 9th:

  • An introduction to Tracker, SPARQL and whatnot:
    Tracker is not (only) a search engine: it is a semantic data storage, powered by RDF ontologies, Nepomuk, and the SPARQL protocol. Tracker is one of the core building blocks of the MeeGo Harmattan operating system; and since release 2.30, it is also a blessed external dependency in GNOME. But it wasn’t until GNOME 3 and the first release of GNOME Documents that it started to get some really good attention… and there is more to come!
  • ModemManager revamped: now supporting LTE/4G modems:
    ModemManager, along with NetworkManager, provides easy-to-use broadband modem connections in the GNOME desktop. With new requirements coming along with the new LTE (4G) communication standards, ModemManager got not only a face-lift, but also a deep surgery to improve its codebase and the way it supports vendor-specific plugins.

    The new ModemManager comes with a new GDBus-powered interface; built-in support for LTE and mixed CDMA+LTE devices; dynamic interfaces and per-interface state machines; helper libmm-common and libmm-glib libraries; a handy “mmcli” command line interface utility; and a new plugin development strategy which is port-type agnostic and based on GIO async calls.

    This talk is an introduction to ModemManager, with special focus on LTE and all the new details and features coming with the new codebase.

Thanks to my employer, Lanedo GmbH, for sponsoring my attendance!

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